2017 Outer Banks Watermelon Festival!

The stage was set, a long table donning a bright red vinyl cover, the contestants patiently waiting for the start. Fans circled around the table, each supporting their contestant or just watching for the show. As the watermelon eating contest took off, so did the chunky spray of watermelon as participants shoved their faces into the fruit as quickly and ferociously as they could. The eating contest was just one of many opportunities people had to gorge themselves as the food came in many forms: watermelon, ice cream, Mulligan’s fish tacos. But, the fun came in even more forms. There were events running seamlessly throughout the day including the ice cream eating contest, the seed spitting contest, and everyone’s favorite…. the watermelon eating contest. Thanks to the planning of our very own events crew, and a day-of help from many volunteers, there were activities for all to enjoy regardless of their interests. Many ki

 

ds tried their hands at a plethora of lawn games and toys, some even took the opportunity to turn their own hands to wax with the ever popular “Wax Hands” station. However, the favorite of the day seemed to be the Pirate inflatable that offered not only a large bounce house, but a waterslide to cool off afterwards. “Food and Fun” was the motto of the day, but the 11th Annual Outer Banks Watermelon Festival had a lot more to it than that. The entire festival was run to support the Outer Banks Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Coalition, a group with a positive mission, “To help facilitate the education and awareness of practical bicycle and pedestrian safety to drivers, pedestrians, cyclists and all those who live or visit the Outer Banks of North Carolina in a positive and proactive manner.” Unfortunately, too many people are injured or killed every year on the Outer Banks trying to cross the highways on bicycles or on foot. For Kitty Hawk Kites, this was an issue that everyone could get behind. Following the Watermelon Festival, when all the money was tallied up, there was $4723 raised! But, the awareness raised can’t be

 

measured. Getting people to recognize the issue at hand and respect the rules of the road can have a lasting effect on the community. If everyone does their part to pay attention and respect the safety of others, hopefully the issue can be eaten away as if it were just a piece of watermelon.

Holiday Update from the KHK Crew

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Celebrate the start of the holiday season with Kitty Hawk Kites at the annual Hangin’ with Santa and Kites with Lights holiday weekend events on Friday, November 25 and Saturday, November 26.

Share your Christmas wishes and get your FREE picture taken with Santa at the Kitty Hawk Kites store at Jockey’s Ridge Crossing in Nags Head on November 25 (10am–2pm) and November 26 (1pm–4pm).

Plus, be sure to make it out to Jockey’s Ridge State Park on November 26 (4pm–6pm) for a light display like none other! Kites with Lights will feature large kites decked out in the spirit of the holidays atop the dunes. In addition, witness the annual Jockey’s Ridge State Park Tree Lighting with The Friends of Jockey’s Ridge that evening at 5pm. Keep warm with cookies and cider for sale at Jockey’s Ridge Crossing, with all proceeds from the bake sale benefitting Beach Food Pantry.

Kitty Hawk Kites in Nags Head and Kitty Hawk Kites in Hatteras will also serve as a local Toys for Tots collection center! Please consider picking up a toy for a child in need while you shop this holiday season. This collection will run from November 20 through December 20. Speaking of shopping, don’t miss out on the annual Thanksgiving Week Super Sale, featuring 20 to 40 percent savings* at all Outer Banks Kitty Hawk Kites, Kitty Hawk Surf Co., and Life is Good locations.

Kayak Fishing, Growing Larger Than a Fisherman’s Tale

http://www.kittyhawk.com/adventures/hobie-kayak-charter-fishing-tour/

Kayak fishing is quickly becoming one of the most popular water sports around. The blend of affordability, versatility, and an improved perspective of fishing have driven the sport far beyond what anyone expected. With the 4th Annual Outer Banks Kayak Fishing Tournament on Saturday, we wanted to take a moment to tell everyone exactly what this sport is all about.

 

 

http://www.kittyhawk.com/adventures/hobie-kayak-charter-fishing-tour/What is so great about “kayak fishing”?

For starters, kayaks are a much more affordable vessel to traverse the water on. You can get yourself into a quality kayak for less money than it would cost to purchase the trailer for a larger boat. Not only do they cost less, but they are incredibly versatile. You can use a kayak in any body of water, whether it is a river, a pond, the bay, or even the ocean. The ability to use kayaks in many bodies of water means you can use it more frequently and easier than with a larger boat. The constant question of “how can I get my boat in to fish that spot?” is no longer a problem. The variety of fishing locations means a variety of fish as well. In our Hobie Charter Fishing Tours alone, we have already had customers catch Drum, Spanish Mackerel, King Mackerel, Blue Fish, Flounder, Trout and much more! You can fish in northern lakes for Muskie, Pike, and Walleye or head to the bay for Drum, Speckled Trout and Flounder. Once on the water, the real fun begins. You get the rush of being right in the water, low to the surface similar to wading, but with the kayak, in a dry and stable platform that gives you a steady spot to reel in your catch.

hobiefishingkayak

What makes the Outer Banks such a great spot for kayak fishing?

Similar to the sport itself, the Outer Banks provide a broad array of fishing styles. The area boasts surf fishing just off the shores, deep sea fishing, sound-side fishing, even fishing back into tributaries like the Alligator River. With such a wide variety, there’s no better way to hit all of them than in a kayak. Pick up some smaller fish back in the rivers and streams; maybe stay near the beaches and reel in some False Albacore, Spanish Mackerel, Blues and Croaker. Or venture further out and go after some deep sea Drum or Mahi. The wild life here is incredible, and the sights you’ll have while out on the water are unmatched. From sunrises in the ocean, to sunsets on the sound, you simply can’t beat the views.

Watermelons for All, All for Watermelons – 10th Annual Outer Banks Watermelon Festival

The stage was set, a long table donning a bright red vinyl cover, the contestants patiently waiting for the start. Fans circled around the table, each supporting their contestant or just watching for the show. As the watermelon eating contest took off, so did the chunky spray of watermelon as participants shoved their faces into the fruit as quickly and ferociously as they could. The eating contest was just one of many opportunities people had to gorge themselves as the food came in many forms: watermelon, ice cream, Mulligan’s fish tacos. But, the fun came in even more forms. There were events running seamlessly throughout the day including the ice cream eating contest, the seed spitting contest, and everyone’s favorite…. the watermelon eating contest. Thanks to the planning of our very own events crew, and a day-of help from many volunteers, there were activities for all to enjoy regardless of their interests. Many kids tried their hands at a plethora of lawn games and toys, some even took the opportunity to turn their own hands to wax with the ever popular “Wax Hands” station. However, the favorite of the day seemed to be the Pirate inflatable that offered not only a large bounce house, but a waterslide to cool off afterwards. “Food and Fun” was the motto of the day, but the 10th Annual Outer Banks Watermelon Festival had a lot more to it than that. The entire festival was run to support the Outer Banks Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Coalition, a group with a positive mission, “To help facilitate the education and awareness of practical bicycle and pedestrian safety to drivers, pedestrians, cyclists and all those who live or visit the Outer Banks of North Carolina in a positive and proactive manner.” Unfortunately, too many people are injured or killed every year on the Outer Banks trying to cross the highways on bicycles or on foot. For Kitty Hawk Kites, this was an issue that everyone could get behind. Following the Watermelon Festival, when all the money was tallied up, there was over $5,000 raised! But, the awareness raised can’t be measured. Getting people to recognize the issue at hand and respect the rules of the road can have a lasting effect on the community. If everyone does their part to pay attention and respect the safety of others, hopefully the issue can be eaten away as if it were just a piece of watermelon.

A day in the life: The 34th Annual Rogallo Kite Festival

Written by: Emma Turnbull- 2016 Marketing Intern

It was a beautiful weekend for the 34th Annual Rogallo Kite Festival! Typical with any kite festival, the wind was not completely cooperative (too light on Friday and too strong on Saturday and Sunday), but it was good enough to get the kites up and give everybody an awesome scene to admire atop Jockey’s Ridge.

dunkin

Rogallo Fest ran on Dunkin’


This was my first kite festival as a Kitty Hawk Kites marketing intern, and I’ll admit I wasn’t exactly sure what to expect when the weekend began. I obviously knew we’d be flying some kites, but I didn’t realize just how massive and impressive they’d be. For instance, our octopus, affectionately dubbed Squiggs, is 100 feet long! As you can imagine, trying to launch and take down Squiggs in strong wind was a bit of a challenge. There were even a couple times it took 5 people to wrangle him. Once he got under control though, he was quite a sight to see, with his huge yellow body and his tentacles flapping around in the clear blue sky. A couple other personal favorites of mine were our giant purple eel and the rainbow koi fish, which both slithered around in the air to the point where they looked like they were swimming against the blue sky. It’s amazing how much of a show can be put on by a bit of cloth, so strong line, and a few poles.

Squiggs

Squiggs, the 100ft Octopus- a personal favorite.


Now, I’m by no means an expert yet, but this weekend taught me a lot and gave me a sneak peek into the world of kite flying. There’s a lot that goes into flying such huge kites. You don’t just need the kite and a line; you need the kite, bridle, line set, carabiner, and sand anchor, and a bit of expert know-how. I learned about the safety when flying large kites, how to tie a larks head, and daisy chain just to name a few of my new skills. Basically, there’s a lot more that goes into flying show kites than I could have ever imagined.

allkites

Not a bad view


As an event crew member, my weekend consisted of a combination of physical labor, interacting with children, and teaching people about kites. To be fair, I didn’t shoulder a huge portion of the physical labor given my small size and utter lack of muscles, but that’s not to say I didn’t pitch in whenever and however I could. One of the highlights for me was set up Saturday morning, when I was helping John Harris, owner and founder of Kitty Hawk Kites, prepare and launch numerous large kites. It was surreal to be able to learn so much from a man who is such an expert in the field.

RevSpinIn addition to the eye catching show kites, visible from across the sound in Manteo, the Rogallo Kite Festival included free stunt kite lessons, and a Revolution Kite Competition. I spent much of my time tending to the larger kites and unfortunately didn’t get to take a lesson, but I did get to talk to many stunt kite flyers, from visitors trying it out for the first time to experienced flyers who travel the country showing of their skills. Watching the performances from afar, the twirls, spins, dives, and other tricks executed but the Revolutions and other stunt kites were every bit as impressive and transfixing as Squiggs’ tentacles in their own way. I look forward to trying it out for myself at the next festival in July!

RevWinners

Revolution Invitation Winners with Rev Rep, Lolly Hadziki, and John Harris


Between digging holes for anchors, talking to curious vacationers on Jockey’s Ridge, and relaunching kites that the wind took down, the days actually sped by. There’s no denying it was hard work, and being out in the sun for 3 full days certainly took its toll. (I have the awkward suntan/burn lines to prove it). There were moments I just wanted to stop what I was doing, lie down, and fall asleep on the spot. But for every funk, there was also a moment equally as funny or inspiring or beautiful to break me out of it. Like the moment a huge kite would get launched and I would just watch it float upward so peacefully into the bright blue sky. Or seeing a kid’s face light up as they watched the koi fish “swimming” through the air. Or honestly just taking a step back and taking in the whole panorama: a beautiful sunny day on the sand dunes with a bunch of colorful kites floating overhead and the ocean in the distance. I now understand peoples’ fascination with kites a whole lot better.

If you missed the Rogallo Festival, don’t fret… The Wright Kite Festival hosted at The Wright Brothers’ National Memorial July 16-17 will feature many of the same show kites (possibly even a few more), free stunt kite lessons, and kite making workshops for the kids. You may also check out this awesome Rogallo Festival recap video below: