A day in the life: The 34th Annual Rogallo Kite Festival

Written by: Emma Turnbull- 2016 Marketing Intern

It was a beautiful weekend for the 34th Annual Rogallo Kite Festival! Typical with any kite festival, the wind was not completely cooperative (too light on Friday and too strong on Saturday and Sunday), but it was good enough to get the kites up and give everybody an awesome scene to admire atop Jockey’s Ridge.

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Rogallo Fest ran on Dunkin’


This was my first kite festival as a Kitty Hawk Kites marketing intern, and I’ll admit I wasn’t exactly sure what to expect when the weekend began. I obviously knew we’d be flying some kites, but I didn’t realize just how massive and impressive they’d be. For instance, our octopus, affectionately dubbed Squiggs, is 100 feet long! As you can imagine, trying to launch and take down Squiggs in strong wind was a bit of a challenge. There were even a couple times it took 5 people to wrangle him. Once he got under control though, he was quite a sight to see, with his huge yellow body and his tentacles flapping around in the clear blue sky. A couple other personal favorites of mine were our giant purple eel and the rainbow koi fish, which both slithered around in the air to the point where they looked like they were swimming against the blue sky. It’s amazing how much of a show can be put on by a bit of cloth, so strong line, and a few poles.

Squiggs

Squiggs, the 100ft Octopus- a personal favorite.


Now, I’m by no means an expert yet, but this weekend taught me a lot and gave me a sneak peek into the world of kite flying. There’s a lot that goes into flying such huge kites. You don’t just need the kite and a line; you need the kite, bridle, line set, carabiner, and sand anchor, and a bit of expert know-how. I learned about the safety when flying large kites, how to tie a larks head, and daisy chain just to name a few of my new skills. Basically, there’s a lot more that goes into flying show kites than I could have ever imagined.

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Not a bad view


As an event crew member, my weekend consisted of a combination of physical labor, interacting with children, and teaching people about kites. To be fair, I didn’t shoulder a huge portion of the physical labor given my small size and utter lack of muscles, but that’s not to say I didn’t pitch in whenever and however I could. One of the highlights for me was set up Saturday morning, when I was helping John Harris, owner and founder of Kitty Hawk Kites, prepare and launch numerous large kites. It was surreal to be able to learn so much from a man who is such an expert in the field.

RevSpinIn addition to the eye catching show kites, visible from across the sound in Manteo, the Rogallo Kite Festival included free stunt kite lessons, and a Revolution Kite Competition. I spent much of my time tending to the larger kites and unfortunately didn’t get to take a lesson, but I did get to talk to many stunt kite flyers, from visitors trying it out for the first time to experienced flyers who travel the country showing of their skills. Watching the performances from afar, the twirls, spins, dives, and other tricks executed but the Revolutions and other stunt kites were every bit as impressive and transfixing as Squiggs’ tentacles in their own way. I look forward to trying it out for myself at the next festival in July!

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Revolution Invitation Winners with Rev Rep, Lolly Hadziki, and John Harris


Between digging holes for anchors, talking to curious vacationers on Jockey’s Ridge, and relaunching kites that the wind took down, the days actually sped by. There’s no denying it was hard work, and being out in the sun for 3 full days certainly took its toll. (I have the awkward suntan/burn lines to prove it). There were moments I just wanted to stop what I was doing, lie down, and fall asleep on the spot. But for every funk, there was also a moment equally as funny or inspiring or beautiful to break me out of it. Like the moment a huge kite would get launched and I would just watch it float upward so peacefully into the bright blue sky. Or seeing a kid’s face light up as they watched the koi fish “swimming” through the air. Or honestly just taking a step back and taking in the whole panorama: a beautiful sunny day on the sand dunes with a bunch of colorful kites floating overhead and the ocean in the distance. I now understand peoples’ fascination with kites a whole lot better.

If you missed the Rogallo Festival, don’t fret… The Wright Kite Festival hosted at The Wright Brothers’ National Memorial July 16-17 will feature many of the same show kites (possibly even a few more), free stunt kite lessons, and kite making workshops for the kids. You may also check out this awesome Rogallo Festival recap video below:

Soaring into Her Future … Literally!

Talk about soaring into the next phase of your life … literally! Imani Davis of Hampton, VA, did just that last Sunday in Manteo. Celebrating her recent high school graduation, Imani enjoyed her very first parasail flight … in her cap and gown! Wow … can you think of a better way to commemorate many years of hard work and dedication in school?! Congrats, Imani … you deserve it! Just another way that Kitty hawk Kites is Teaching The World To Fly#KHKExperience

Parasailing in Manteo: High School graduation celebration (5/15/16)

KHK Celebrates Amazing Women in Aviation

Behind every good man, there’s a great woman… so who’s behind every great woman? Women’s History Month (March), International Women’s Day (March 8), and Women of Aviation Worldwide Week (March 7-13) has had us thinking about some pretty impressive ladies. Aviation history is full of women breaking social norms, setting records, and pioneering new ways.

We’ve managed to narrow down our 5 favorite aviatrix to share them with you here…

amelia_earhart_1928Amelia Earhart: Most famous for being the first female (and second person male or female) to fly nonstop solo across the Atlantic, Amelia Earhart was also the first  female to fly nonstop solo across the US, and the first pilot ever to fly solo from Hawaii to the US. Her last mission was to be the first woman to fly around the world. With only a few thousand miles left, Amelia vanished into a stormy night.

 

Jacqueline_Cochran_in_P-40Jacqueline Cochran: Record holder for many altitude, speed, and distance challenges of her time, Jacqueline Cochran, was the first female pilot to take off and land on an aircraft carrier, the first woman to fly a bomber across the Atlantic, and the first pilot ever to fly above 20,000 ft without an oxygen mask. Recruiter and instructor for female combat pilots in WWII, Jacqueline was also the first aviatrix to run a Marilyn Monroe endorsed cosmetics company.


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Patty Wagstaff: As one of the best airshow pilots in the world, Patty Wagstaff has claimed gold, silver, and bronze medals in numerous Olympic level international Aerobatic Competitions. She is the first woman ever to become the US National Aerobatic Champion, and one of few to win such a title three times in a row. Patty is the recipient of numerous awards including the “First Lady of Aerobatics” Betty Skelton Award, “Sword of Excellence” Award, and “Bill Barber Award for Showmanship”. Patty has also been inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Fame and was most recently awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award by the Air Force Association.

 

another-tough-day-at-the-officeKari Castle: A three-time Hang Gliding World Champion, Hang Gliding and Paragliding National Champion, and multi world record holder in Women’s Hang Gliding, Kari is the first woman to qualify for the US National Hang Gliding Team. Kari still competes in Hang Gliding competition and leads clinics across the US including the 2014 Hang Gliding Spectacular here on the OBX.

 

 jennyJenny Hawk: The Outer Banks’ very own fearless female flyer, Jenny Hawk takes to the sky with her company, OBX Airplane, pulling banners, giving air tours, and teaching countless aspiring pilots, including Kitty Hawk Kites founder, John Harris, how to fly. Jenny has overcome tremendous adversities, but she continues to do the thing she loves and continues to inspire new pilots as they begin their aviation career.

 

 

These five woman are just a few of many, many impressive aviatrix… Who is your favorite female aviator? Share with us below!

Kayaking Outer Banks-All Season Beauty

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Enjoying a Currituck Sound sunset by kayak.

The northeast wind off the ocean is a chilly reminder that winter is coming. Out on the sounds, the duck, geese and swans are carpeting the water, migrating to the bays and estuaries in a cycle of life that as constant as the change of the seasons.

Yet even this time of the year, as the days get shorter and the the Outer Banks goes back to its small town roots, there are still some great opportunities to enjoy the beauty that surrounds us.

One of the best ways to explore the natural world of the Outer Banks is by kayak, and the fall and winter are great times to get on the water. There are a number of reasons for that.

Wind is the bane of many kayakers existence, and yes there usually a northeast wind at this time of the year, but the waters of Outer Banks sounds are to the west and are well-protected from the wind.

Because there are so few visitors at this time of the year, renting kayaks at almost any time should not be a problem.

Bugs are the great irritant of summer kayaking—yes, bug repellant does work, but it is nice to be on the water without a swarm of insects overhead.

Guided tours are still offered at this time of the year, but availability is very restricted so be sure to call ahead if plans include a guided tour. But for more experienced kayakers, the offseason is a golden opportunity to get on the water.

We’re including a list of kayak put-in sites with a couple of notes about some of the sites. We may have missed a few sites, but this is a good starting point.

Corolla

Whalehead Club

Offers a wonderful and different view of the storied art nouveau mansion. Paddling north leads to classic estuarine waters.

Duck

Duck town boardwalk

There are a number of docks designed for easy kayak access.

Southern Shores

No public put-in. However, civic associations maintain docks and parks along the Currituck Sound.

Kitty Hawk

Dock of the Bay, Bob Perry Rd.

A great access point to Kitty Hawk Bay and Albemarle Sound. Located on a wide creek. Great fishing too.

Sandy Run Park, The Woods Road

Beautiful setting. A little difficult to get out of the pond.

Kill Devil Hills

Dock Street boat ramp Between W. Durham and Avalon Dr.,

Access immediately to the sound.

Second Bridge leading to Colington, Colington Road

Protected area leading to wide expanse of Kitty Hawk Bay.

Nags Head

Jockey’s Ridge State Park/Soundside Road

A little more remote and harder to find, but interesting paddle.

Oregon Inlet Fishing Center

Almost at the foot of Bonner Bridge

Manteo

Bridge leading to Roanoke Island Festival Park

Very protected setting. A great paddle around Ice Plant Island that is the home of Roanoke Island Festival Park.

Washington Baum Bridge Boat Ramp

Across from Pirate’s Cove entrance. Maintained by NC Fish & Wildlife

Hatteras Island

New Inlet

Nature abounds. A real favorite. Part of Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge.

Mainland

Milltail Creek, Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge

One of the most popular kayak paddles around and for good reason. Beautiful and relatively protected.

Most NC Fish & Wildlife ramps have provisions for kayaks.

Kayak Fishing Tournament Coming to OBX

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The Outer Banks has always been famous for it’s fishing, and when fall rolls around it’s tournament time. There are so many fishing tournaments that we’re not even sure we can list them all, but the Kitty Hawk Surf Company Kayak Fishing Tournament coming up September 19 really seems to standout just because it’s so different.

It seems as though fishing from a kayak keeps getting more popular all the time, which makes a lot of sense because it is a wonderful way to experience the beauty of the Outer Banks and have some fun at the same time.

All the action will be in the sounds, and almost all of the Outer Banks is in play. The rules call for kayakers to fish from Hatteras Inlet to the Wright Memorial Bridge, including the western shoreline of the sounds.

This is a catch and release tournament—bring your camera because that’s how the judging is going to be done. Flounder, Speckled Trout, and Red Drum will be the catch of the day.

Tournament rules call for a first light start time–that’s 6:48 a.m. on September 19. All pics must be to the judges by 5:00 p.m.

There is a $40 entry fee and a mandatory meeting on Friday, September 18 at Kitty Hawk Surf Company at Jockey’s Ridge Crossing in Nags Head. Proceeds will benefit the North Carolina Coastal Land Trust.